Last edited by Male
Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

4 edition of Bess of Hardwick. found in the catalog.

Bess of Hardwick.

Ethel Carleton Williams

Bess of Hardwick.

by Ethel Carleton Williams

  • 179 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Longmans, Green in London, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain
    • Subjects:
    • Shrewsbury, Elizabeth Hardwick Talbot, Countess of, 1520-1608.,
    • Women landowners -- Great Britain -- Biography.,
    • Nobility -- Great Britain -- Biography.,
    • Great Britain -- History -- Elizabeth, 1558-1603 -- Biography.

    • Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDA358.S4 W5
      The Physical Object
      Pagination312 p.
      Number of Pages312
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6267390M
      LC Control Number59003106
      OCLC/WorldCa798519

        From the bestselling author of The Mitford Girls: A 'wonderfully researched' (Sunday Express) biography of Bess of Hartwick, the most powerful woman in England next to Queen Elizabeth Bringing 'the Tudor Age to exuberant life' (Hugh Massingberd, Mail on Sunday), Mary S. Lovell tells the story of Bess of Hardwick,, one of the most remarkable women of the 5/5(6). Bess of Hardwick's Letters is the first book-length study of the c. letters to and from the remarkable Elizabethan dynast, matriarch and builder of houses Bess of Hardwick (c. –). By surveying the complete correspondence, author Alison Wiggins uncovers the wide range of uses to which Bess put letters: they were vital to her.

        From the bestselling author of The Mitford Girls: A 'wonderfully researched' (Sunday Express) biography of Bess of Hartwick, the most powerful woman in England next to Queen Elizabeth. Bringing 'the Tudor Age to exuberant life' (Hugh Massingberd, Mail on Sunday), Mary S. Lovell tells the story of Bess of Hardwick,, one of the most remarkable women of the /5(). In August , it is possible that Bess became involved in another scandal. Lady Katherine Grey, second daughter of Bess’ old mistress, Lady Frances, had secretly married the Earl of a member of the royal family (and many believed Lady Katherine to be Elizabeth’s heir) to marry without consent was treason. Hertford was abroad, so Katherine, finding herself .

      Bess now threw herself into the works at Hardwick. She lived in the Old Hall with Sir William and his wife, but spent many hours overseeing the works, and checking the details of the weekly accounts. The stone, the timber, the iron and the marble all came from her estates, and she even set up a glass making plant on site. Bess of Hardwick started out life in a pretty nondescript sort of way, but when she died she was the second wealthiest woman in England, coming in only after the Queen herself. She fought for her rights, managed her own finances, and she took the money she inherited through her marriages and invested it wisely.


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Bess of Hardwick by Ethel Carleton Williams Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bess of Hardwick: Empire Builder by Mary S. Lovell is a very detailed biography of Englands most influential and richest woman (second to the Queen) of the 16th century. In this book, Lovell sets out to correct earlier biographies mistaken accounts of Bess and to reveal the highly intelligent, personable and politically savvy woman she was/5.

Mary Lovell's book on Bess of Hardwick is no exception. An amazing true Bess of Hardwick. book of a woman in the Elizabethan era who was able to survive the economic and political minefields of the times, when many men went under. The detail describing the difficulties of daily living, running a household and travelling even short distances help to put the Cited by: 2.

This book gives the reader a very in depth look at Bess of Hardwick. It surprised me that there is so Bess of Hardwick. book information available about her considering the times but that is just one of many things that will surprise you about Bess.

She was a woman far ahead of her time. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn about Bess/5(72). Buy a cheap copy of Bess of Hardwick: First Lady of book by Mary S. Lovell. The best account yet available of this shrewd, enigmatic and remarkable woman.—Sunday Times [London]From the author of The Sisters, a chronicle of the most Free shipping over $Cited by: 2.

"The best account yet available of this shrewd, enigmatic and remarkable woman."&#;Sunday Times [London] From the author of The Sisters, a chronicle of the most brutal, turbulent, and exuberant period of England's history. Bess Hardwick, the fifth daughter /5(8). By the time that she moved into Hardwick New Hall, Elizabeth (‘Bess’), Countess of Shrewsbury, was 70 years old and the richest woman in England after the queen.

Built just a stone’s throw from the site of her childhood home, the house was a deliberate – and typically unsubtle – statement of her wealth and power. Bess was born into a family of respectable but impoverished Derbyshire landowners. They owned land in and around Hardwick and a modest manor house on the site of Hardwick Old Hall.

Bess left home at the age of 12 to serve at nearby Codnor Castle, and by the age of 15 she had married Robert Barlow, heir to a neighbouring gentry family. Bess was, in Lovell's words, "born to shop," and her meticulously kept expense accounts richly evoke the texture of Tudor life: from lampreys and oysters at a few pence apiece to much larger sums Author: Adam Goodheart.

Bess of Hardwick was born around to John Hardwick of Derbyshire and his wife Elizabeth Leeke. The Hardwicks did not hold prestigious offices and the highest office that they ever achieved was esquire. John Hardwick died at. Buy Bess Of Hardwick: First Lady of Chatsworth New Ed by Mary S.

Lovell (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low /5(). This is the question BBC History Magazine's David Musgrove put to British historians while researching his book Places That Made Britain ().

Here, in an extract from the book, Musgrove visits Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire, which was built by the "fantastically wealthy" Bess of Hardwick in the 16th century. Bess of Hardwick. BORN: • Derbyshire, England DIED: Febru • Derbyshire, England English landowner. Elizabeth Hardwick, known as Bess of Hardwick, rose from modest origins to become the wealthiest woman in Elizabethan England after the queen herself.

Bess Of Hardwick by Mary S. Lovell,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(K). Bess Hardwick (–) started out respectably enough, but would have gotten lost among the numerous progeny of her well-born but improvident family of gentlemen farmers had she not been married off brilliantly at only to be widowed two years later by Author: Mary S.

Lovell. 6: The Stepchildren of Bess of Hardwick Family Tree: Selective Tree Showing the Heirs of Henry VII Notes Bibliography Acknowledgements The earliest known portrait of Bess c, still at Hardwick Hall Hardwick Hall. Bess was born in the original house inbut it is shown here after Bess had remodelled it half a century later4/5(32).

From the bestselling author of The Mitford Girls: A 'wonderfully researched' (Sunday Express) biography of Bess of Hartwick, the most powerful woman in England next to Queen Elizabeth. Bringing 'the Tudor Age to exuberant life' (Hugh Massingberd, Mail on Sunday), Mary S.

Lovell tells the story of Bess of Hardwick, one of the most remarkable women of the 5/5(2). A book purported to be about Bess of Hardwick, I looked forward to exploring the life of such an important figure in female history during the Elizabethan age.

From what I've gleaned from Wikipedia and other research sources, I knew her to come from rough beginning to rise as one of the wealthiest women of her era, ancestress of throne claimants/5(56). Editorial Reviews. Praise for Venus in Winter: "A vast panorama of Tudor history, from the viewpoint of a legendary woman who loomed large in it—the redoubtable, fabulously wealthy, much-married Bess of Hardwick."—Margaret George, author of Elizabeth I: The Novel “Venus in Winter does justice to the extraordinary, powerful, and dangerous Bess of Hardwick/5(6).

Hardwick Hall is unique among National Trust properties. Most are monuments to the men of British history (the good ones and the bad ones).

Hardwick Hall is a monument to a woman and a very formidable woman at that. Elizabeth Shrewsbury, colloquially known as Bess of Hardwick, wielded power in an age when women did [ ].

Burton Book Review Rating: stars My previous review of Gillian's novel The Darling Strumpet The author of The September Queen explores Tudor England with the tale of Bess of Hardwick—the formidable four-time widowed Tudor dynast who became one of the most powerful women in the history of England.

Bess of Hardwick's Letters is the first book-length study of the c. letters to and from the remarkable Elizabethan dynast, matriarch and builder of houses Bess of Hardwick (c. –). By surveying the complete correspondence, author Alison Wiggins uncovers the wide range of uses to which B.To: Bess of Hardwick Born Elizabeth Hardwick (in c/2, d.

13 February ), the woman known to posterity as Bess of Hardwick married four times during her life, as a result of which her name changed from Hardwick to Barlow (or Barley), Cavendish, St Loe and then finally (when she was countess of Shrewsbury and then dowager countess) Talbot.This book tells the story of Bess of Hardwick in the time of Henry vIII through to the death of Elizabeth Tudor.

It tells of her four marriages to four different men and shows through her eyes the upheavals of all the events until the death of the Queen in /5(17).